Games

In the following game, Rob Killeen shows how a 19th Century Master helped inspire him in a recent online encounter

[Event "Rated Blitz game"] [Site "lichess.org"] [Date "2020.04.14"] [Round "?"] [White "mortar98"] [Black "RobKilleen"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C50"] [WhiteElo "2011"] [BlackElo "2006"] [Annotator "https://lichess.org/@/RobKilleen"] [PlyCount "31"] [EventDate "2020.??.??"] [EventType "blitz"] [TimeControl "180"] [WhiteClock "0:02:08"] [BlackClock "0:01:46"] {[%evp 0,31,19,31,31,38,21,13,24,17,19,19,19,2,11,-26,-21,-17,90,124,228,106, 268,0,220,32,315,304,309,225,-29992,-29993,-29994,-29995]} {I played this 3 minute blitz game on LiChess. (Typically, 'Blitz' is where each player is allocated just 3, 5 or 10 minutes to make all their moves). This miniature involves an early Queen sacrifice that I would love to say was all my own idea but, in truth, my inspiraton comes from a Mikhail Chigorin game, played almost 150 years ago. Chigorin was a Russian master, who challenged Steinitz for the world championship in 1889. He was a creative, attacking player with an unusual style and I first became a fan after reading Kasparov's book, 'My Great Predecessors'. I've since gone read a number of his games and one game I particularly enjoyed was the Knorre v Chigorin encounter at St Petersburg, 1874. When the opening moves of my game, mirrored Knorre-Chigorin, the scene was set : - } 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 3. Bc4 { [%emt 0:00:02]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 4. O-O {[%emt 0:00:02]} Bc5 {[%emt 0:00: 09]} 5. d3 {[%emt 0:00:02]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} { I've reached this position several times before and I find most players tend to opt for 6. h3. The likely logic being : - A) White wants to play 6. Bg5 to pin the King's Knight B) Black may well reciprocate with 6. ... Bg4 C) Therefore, playing 6. h3 first, prevents black's pin and saves Bg4 for the next move, when black is likely to have castled King side } 6. Bg5 {[%emt 0:00:01]} h6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} { White retains the pin but Black hasn't yet committed to castling kingside and can play 7. ... g5. This type of attacking move can often come at a cost. It may weaken Black's king-side and, for Black, castling to the safety of the Queen-side will take time - a further 3 moves which white can use to build up his own Queen side attack.} 7. Bh4 {[%emt 0:00:01]} g5 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 8. Bg3 {[%emt 0:00:01]} {Here, we reach the key position in Knorre v Chigorin} h5 $1 {[%emt 0:00:05] Chigorin played the surprising move h5! And the piece sacrifices start here ! The White Knight is free to take the pawn on g5 and then threatens Nxf7 with a fork on the Queen and Rook.} 9. Nxg5 {[%emt 0:00:04] The Stockfish engine prefers 9. h4 and already thinks Black is better.} h4 $1 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 10. Nxf7 {[%emt 0:00:04]} hxg3 $6 {[%emt 0:00:04] And Chigorin offers a Queen sacrifice ! Now, with the benefit of computer analysis, I know that 10. ... Qe7 is probably best and will still give Black lots of opportunities to attack. However, the opportunity to emulate your hero doesn't come along every day!} 11. hxg3 $5 {[%emt 0:00:03] Now, my game deviates slightly from Knorre v Chigorin. Here, Knorre played Nxd8 against Chigorin and took the Queen but my opponent senses danger and hesitates. Hmm ! So, White didnt take my Queen, as expected. Nevertheless, I now see what Chigorin saw and I can still follow his strategy, - and that strategy was to attack with the Rook and the minor pieces.} Bg4 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 12. Nxd8 {[%emt 0:00:12]} Rxd8 {[%emt 0:00:09] Offering the Queen yet again!} 13. Qd2 {[%emt 0:00:03] The Stockfish valuation now has Black well ahead} Nd4 {[%emt 0: 00:01] White has a threat on Ne2+, which which Blacks looks to cover} 14. Nc3 { [%emt 0:00:05]} Nf3+ $3 {[%emt 0:00:03] but now comes yet another sacrifice which proves the ultimate blow} 15. gxf3 {[%emt 0:00:06] The only move} Bxf3 { [%emt 0:00:01]} 16. Bf7+ {[%emt 0:00:27] White plays a move but then immediately resigns without waiting for a reply. After ... Kxf7, White cannot stop the Rook from mating on h1. In principle, the mating net is the same as Chigorin's creative masterpiece. Knorre,Victor - Chigorin,Mikhail Ivanovich [C50] St Petersburg St Petersburg, 1874 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0–0 Nf6 5.d3 d6 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bh4 g5 8.Bg3 h5 9.Nxg5 h4 10.Nxf7 hxg3 11.Nxd8 Bg4 12. Qd2 Nd4 13.Nc3 Nf3+ 14.gxf3 Bxf3 0–1} 0-1

The following game, is the recent Board 1 Perriman Cup encounter against Basildon I, between Trevor Coote and Radu Bara

[Event "Perriman Cup"] [Site "Billericay Chess Club"] [Date "2019.10.09"] [Round "?"] [White "Bara, Radu"] [Black "Coote, Trevor"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C00"] [Annotator "Killeen,Robert"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2019.10.09"] [WhiteTeam "Basildon"] [BlackTeam "Billericay"] {Billericay I v Basildon I Board 1} 1. e4 e6 2. f4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. Nf3 Nc6 5. c3 Nh6 6. Bb5 Qb6 7. Bxc6+ bxc6 8. O-O Ba6 9. d3 $15 c4+ 10. d4 c5 11. Na3 cxd4 12. Nxd4 Bxa3 13. Qa4+ Bb5 $1 14. Qxa3 (14. Qxb5+ Qxb5) 14... Nf5 15. Rd1 Bd7 16. g4 Nxd4 17. Rxd4 Rb8 18. Rb1 f6 19. Be3 Qc7 20. Bf2 Rb5 21. exf6 gxf6 22. Re1 Kf7 23. b3 Rg8 24. h3 h5 25. bxc4 dxc4 26. f5 Rxf5 $17 27. Red1 Bc6 $40 { And now ...Bd5 would win. Black attacks with force.} 28. Rxc4 $2 (28. Qd6 { nothing else works.} Qxd6 29. Rxd6 hxg4 30. Rxc6 gxh3+ {Discovered Attack} 31. Kh1 Rxf2 32. Rc7+ Kg6 33. Rg1+ Rg2 34. Rxg2+ hxg2+ 35. Kxg2) 28... hxg4 29. hxg4 (29. Rxg4 $19 Rxg4+ 30. hxg4 Rxf2 31. Kxf2 Qf4+ {Double Attack} 32. Ke1 Qe3+ 33. Kf1 Bb5+ 34. Kg2 Qe2+ 35. Kg3 Qxd1 36. Qxa7+ Kg6 37. Qe3 Qd6+ 38. Qf4 Qd3+ 39. Qf3) 29... Rh5 (29... Rh8 $142 $1 30. Qf8+ Kxf8 31. Bc5+ Kf7 32. Rd7+ Qxd7 33. gxf5 Rh1+ 34. Kf2 Qd2+ {Double Attack} 35. Kg3 Qh2+ 36. Kg4 Qh4#) 30. Rxc6 Rxg4+ {Black mates.} ({Worse is} 30... Qxc6 31. Qxa7+ Ke8 32. Qb8+ Kf7 33. Qa7+ Ke8 34. Qb8+ Kf7 35. Qa7+ $11) 31. Kf1 Qxc6 32. Qxa7+ Kg6 33. Rd3 Qe4 34. Re3 Rh1+ 35. Ke2 Qc2+ 36. Kf3 Rh3+ 37. Kxg4 Qf5# 0-1

Here is a game from last year's Club Championship, between club members, Theo Todman and Dale Bailey
[Event "Billericay Chess Club Championship"] [Site "Anisha Grange"] [Date "2018.10.31"] [Round "?"] [White "Todman, Theo"] [Black "Bailey, Dale"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A22"] [Annotator "Killeen,Robert"] [PlyCount "89"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] {Club Championship 2018/2019} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d3 d6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. e3 O-O 7. Be2 h6 8. Bh4 Re8 9. O-O Be6 10. a3 d5 11. Qc2 d4 12. Ne4 Nxe4 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. dxe4 dxe3 15. fxe3 Qc5 16. Qc3 f6 17. b4 Qf8 18. b5 Ne7 19. Nxe5 Rad8 20. Bh5 Nc8 21. Bxe8 Qxe8 22. Nf3 Nd6 23. e5 Ne4 24. Qc2 f5 25. Nd4 Qg6 26. Nxe6 Qxe6 27. Rad1 Rxd1 28. Qxd1 Qxe5 29. Qd5+ Qxd5 30. cxd5 Nd6 31. a4 g6 32. h3 Kg7 33. g4 Kf6 34. gxf5 gxf5 35. Rf4 Ne4 36. Kg2 Ke5 37. Rh4 Kxd5 38. Rxh6 Nc3 39. Rh4 c6 40. Rd4+ Kc5 41. bxc6 bxc6 42. h4 Nd5 43. h5 Nxe3+ 44. Kf3? Ng4? 45. Rxg4 { Black Resigns} 1-0